lforner



Poetry: Remixed

After an extremely inspiring and productive discussion with my PLN this morning, I was given the idea of centring an innovative poetry unit around Komninos, the performance poet who now does a lot to do with media poetry. I have to sincerely thank @madiganda, @vivimat78, @shereej3, and a new connection I made this morning, @KatApel, for collaborating with me to form such a great idea for a poetry unit. Yet another reason to LOVE my PLN!

I was aiming to find something innovative and inspiring for my Year 10 class to follow on from what I know would have been a great unit on protest poetry for them as Year 9. I originally wanted to do something similar to Poetry Pals, a program which connects people from different backgrounds though poetry, however, I had left the run too late to start collaboration on such an epic task as that. I will save that idea up for another year, and hopefully be able to encourage students to compose poetry about their experience as ‘country’ kids, and learn from their sister city classmates about life in the city.

After my conversation this morning, however, I have decided to go with something a little more radical, and look at ‘remixed’ poetry, which will allow me to draw my students attention to the way in which our culture is constructed as a remix of the past, popular and high culture, and the modern and traditional. Whilst a post-modern or post-humanism unit is probably beyond the scope of these kids’ interest and ability, this unit will allow me to dip into these things a little bit, and hopefully result in them developing some critical thinking skills akin to those associated with these movements.

The study of radical forms and content matter of poetry will naturally require contextualising, and thus students will be required to view today’s culture through a critical lens: Why would poets choose to be different and radical? What message are they trying to convey through this choice?

I have had many many suggestions for poets and poetry which will be useful. For the time being, I am going to investigate in detail:

Komninos
Pam Ayres
Herrick
Free Verse novel extracts (esp. Sally Murphy: Pearl vs the World)
Yellow Rage
and zombie poetry, which I came across a couple of weeks ago, quite by accident!

I am also interested in poetry by cybernetics, and perhaps can source machine generated poetry which I vaguely remember being told about….

If you are interested in this unit or have suggestions, please feel free to contribute them in this space! I will post the unit up on the blog as it progresses.

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Comments

  1. * Mark O'Meara says:

    This all sounds very exciting, Lauren. I must admit, however, that much as I enjoy the odd snippet of poetry, I am something of a heathen when it comes to understanding the mechanics and processes, which is probably the major reason why I’ve never don’t anything beyond choose-and-read-aloud exercises with my own classes.

    Still, I am keen to learn and redress this whole in my education.

    | Reply Posted 5 years, 5 months ago
    • No worries Mark, we will be learning together! I have done PBL units before but nothing as radical as what I am talking about here! I am teaching poetry first up this year for yr 10, when does it arise in your scope and sequence?

      | Reply Posted 5 years, 5 months ago
  2. * Mark O'Meara says:

    I should know when we’d be doing it soon. There are five Year 10 English teachers and we’d all need to do this unit or something similar. I expect that we’ll meet tomorrow, so I’ll be back in touch.

    | Reply Posted 5 years, 5 months ago


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